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German eastern settlement in the middle ages by Arminius1871 German eastern settlement in the middle ages by Arminius1871
I was not really satisfied with this:

So I made a new one, with my reference sadly only until the 14th century. There were
more settlement waves in the coming centuries, especially after the Turk wars and also
in the eastern part of East Prussia.

Short history:

Afte the great peoples migration time and the fall of the Roman Empire, most germanic
tribes left East Europe and migrated west- and southwards, creating the basis for many
coming european nations (Spain: Western Gothic Empire; France: Frankish Empire;
Italy: Eastern Gothic Empire and Langobards; England: Anglo-Saxons; Germany: several germanic tribes)

Not all Germanics left the areas, but were assimilated with the coming slavic tribes.
During the early middleage an age with a warm climate began and the Germans had a great
fertility rate. New agricultural technology enabled more food for the people and very often
the kings in the east (Poland, Hungary, Bohemia...) called for german settlers to get new tax payers
and western european laws and technology (Magdeburg and Lübeck law), or as defenders against
the invaders from Asia (Mongolstorm, Tartars, Huns, Turks etc.).

But the reason why they started to colonize the area between Saale and Oder river at all was,
that during the rulership of king Heinrich (10th century), slavic tribes invaded the kingdom and so the
Germans started to strike back and create "Marken" (borderland fortification areas). Beside the later
rather peaceful settlement (for example in Silesia), this were rather bloody battles. Also religion
and power reasons played a role of course.

The earlierst territory that was colonized by Germans, was Austria (German Eastern Mark/ borderland).
The german tribe of the Bavarians moved first along the Danube and Inn river, down to South Tyrol
and the area where now Vienna is and later on they moved into all the eastern alpine valleys.

The teutonic order had also a lot of battles with non-christians tribes, especially in Poland
and the baltic territories. They needed german settlers to secure supply, that´s how
Prussia was born (the german settlers also mixed with the baltic Pruzzen). That´s also a reason
why many baltic cities look rather german (Hansa architecture).

The german eastern settlement stopped when the plague haunted Europe. But smaller settlements
especially after the last Turk wars came up again along the Danube and in Siebenbürgen (Trannsylvania).

The history of the german culture in the east ended, when Stalin ordered in 1945 with permission of the western allied powers to deport or murder 15 million Germans from these territories. Only tiny minorities are left today.
_____________________

Wikipedia:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ostsiedl…
Add a Comment:
 
:iconillu-minatrix:
Illu-Minatrix Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
wow very good map ^^ your maps are ever the best :) will you somtime do another map with the settlement waves which were later ?
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
Thanks so much! I did it once, but the old map was ugly so I deleted it XD
Reply
:iconillu-minatrix:
Illu-Minatrix Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2017
ah i can see xD
Reply
:iconnealman11:
NealMan11 Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2016
German settlements in... Romania? What happened there?
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2016
Huns and Turks happened there XD

The invasions from the east depopulated these regions, so the hungaryan king called Germans to secure the borderlands
and also for farming and new taxes ofc. The Germans simply shipped down the danube river and settled along it or in
neighbour regions. We all know what happened from 1945 on with the eastern Germans, they were expelled or even killed.
The last one who stayed left after 1990, and only very very few are still there.
Reply
:iconmaptigan:
maptigan Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2016
Very interesting and beautiful map. There's something about the font I find a bit off for a map like this, but it works. :D

Have you read A Terrible Revenge by Alfred-Maurice de Zayas? Very good book!
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2016
Thansk^^ Oh should I make the font historical?^^


I heard about it
Reply
:iconledaverix:
LeDaverix Featured By Owner May 23, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Nette Karte.... aber wo ist der Neusiedler See? :o
Ansonsten sehr detailiert, gute arbeit.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner May 23, 2016
Danke, ja bei der Vorlage waren fast gar keine Seen, nur ganz große, die ganzen bayerischen fehlen auch^^
danke!
Reply
:icondeuseversor:
DeusEversor Featured By Owner May 5, 2016
Miśnia [*] Łużyce [*] Weleci [*]
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner May 6, 2016
Where there Germans too? I don´t know where it is exactly.
Reply
:iconathicer:
Athicer Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2016
I see a lot of quite large settlement areas that were no longer settled by Germans by around 1900, is that correct? Like the Austrian extension around Tyrnau (I knew Pressburg was a German city, but did concentrated German settlement-area reach this far into Slovakia? :o) or the giant Sprachinsel in northern Slovakia/southern Poland?
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2016
The one at Pressburg lasted rather long, it changed with the 1. world war,
the Germans from cities like Marburg an der Drau left by their own, cause they
didn´t to become minorities or were forced to leave. Not as brutal as in ww 2.
but also forced.

Slovakia was still settled after that, especially in Käsmark and Zips, but don´t forget this
spots on the map don´t mean there live only 100% Germans, it was also mixed always.
Reply
:iconathicer:
Athicer Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2016
But I mean, there are also quite a few German-speaking (be it mixed) areas that faded away between 1400 and 1900, right? Because a lot of the Sprachinseln that I see on this map were smaller or nonexistent in ethnic maps of 1850-1914, like this one: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia… (this one is from 1855).

So I mean, is it correct that some areas settled (sometimes in part) by Germans vanished or were assimilated between 1400 and 1900? Like the connection of Brünn, Wischau and Iglau to the Sudetenland, the German Sprachinsel around Kolin, Kuttenberg and Tschaslau, the German area around Tyrnau and the German Sprachinsel around Königsberg, Schemnitz and Karpfen in Slovakia, to name a few examples?
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2016
The german regions that faded away I know was especially the link
between the huge Iglau language island in Bohemia, I think because of
the Hussits.

And don´t forget some might just naturally disappear. Yes it is indeed possible.
It´s also possible that mixed up and later didn´t know anymore they´re Germans.
Reply
:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
I'm really satisfied with this arminius.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2016
That map really needed some time, I´m glad you like it :)
Reply
:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2016  Hobbyist Writer
This tells me where my German cousins live at. 
Reply
:iconpatrics:
patrics Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2015
Thank for the map.
According to
www.dfk-danzig.de/
in my beloved Stadt Danzig there is about 2000 of native people. Mostly elderly as younger generation moved to the west in few waves of emigration from soviet controlled Poland.

Poles still hate Germans but it is possible to live in Danzig for a German now. I know few people who are born in Danzig before 1945 or their descendants who moved back to Danzig and surroundings. Does it reverse a history a bit? I wish it does.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2015
Yes a tiny minority is still there, and even a few dozen in East Prussia.

A tiny bit yes, but the land in the east seems lost, at least I don´t see
anything that would change it in the next decades.
Reply
:iconpropagandastamps:
PropagandaStamps Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2015
Great map!
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2015
Thanks!
Reply
:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
You could mention something like,  most famous:

Slovakia: Rudolf Schuster 
Romania: Klaus Iohannis

also why is some part of map out of corner/square?
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2015
Wow didn´t know about Rudolf Schuster!

Cause else the transylvania settlements wouldn´t be on the map anymore. Same for the other parts.
Reply
:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2015
Yeah, (Only half), I didn't know that either :D 

I also discovered Emil Páleš, (a guy his work I like), is also from Carpathian Germans descendants. 
He's kinda panslavist, but also study aryan culture he was recently in Iran/Persia.

Also when it comes to immigration he explained how back then, his family was offered by someone from Germany to come there not because they were Germans but mainly because they wanted them as work force, since his parents were dentists (Master's Degree) so they get offer 10 times higher salary and flat if they come to Germany, it was almost newer about (moral bullshit) refugees, but, about Gemrany demand for qualified workers.

Also in Moravia started DNA research to find descendants from Greate moravia and of Saints Cyril and Methodius for free, but, it is prefered to have old name and be from that region. 
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 8, 2015
Cool did u make that test?
Reply
:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2015
nah, I would have to travel, to give my saliva sample
Reply
:iconxgeograd:
xGeograd Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
stab is srry for germani killing ::::::::::;;;;;;;;;;;(((((((((((999999999999
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
You are from USA minor outlaying islands? WTF is that, Hawaii? XD
Reply
:iconklausvonkueste:
KlausVonKueste Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
Very interesting!
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
Thanks!
Reply
:iconklausvonkueste:
KlausVonKueste Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
You're welcome!
Reply
:iconlinumhortulanus:
Linumhortulanus Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Very interessting facts! Very exact map! Very good work!


It's sad that such things aren't taught well in schools...
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Thanks so much!

Yes we never really learned about that at school, we wasted time
learning about egyptian agriculture, but did not even mention anything
about the germanic tribes oO XD
Reply
:iconlucas7500:
lucas7500 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
Hey remember my Great-Grandma that i think is German, well my mother is saying that she may be jewish but i remembered my Aunt saying that she looked rather germaninc ("Blue eyes and yellow hair") and was with a strong appearance, though if she was jewish i'm beginning to think that she was a jewish german and immigrated due to the new job offers or trying to escape repercussion.... yeah i wished i knewt more about my family lineage... they didn't really record the data. One motive that my mother thinks her grandma was Jewish is because her surname was Enze wich i thought was a "portuguized" name of Heinz or maybe was Enzo wich is basically Heinz but they mispelled when writing...so i'm really confused about this.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
There were also nordic looking jewish Germans. It is true that jews tried for
centuries always to only get children with other jews and have a distinct
southlandic look. But there were surely mixings, too.

Heinz is a common name in my area, it´s a short word for Heinrich (Henry)
actually^^

But not all Germans that left in that time were jews, also normal Germans
were oppressed often.
Reply
:iconlucas7500:
lucas7500 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
Ok!
Reply
:iconhardwing:
Hardwing Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Great work!
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Thanks man!
Reply
:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
what a lovely map.
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Thanks a lot :)
Reply
:iconpardos66:
pardos66 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Willkommen.
Reply
:iconscipia:
Scipia Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Interesting map ^^ I wonder if in an alternate timeline (where Magyar stay in Russia)
Germany could've settle Pannonia too. So there would be a territorial "continuation"
with German's Banat.

 It's also seems that Slovaquia was heavily Germanized, I didn't know that.
Do you know how many % of the population was German before the fall of Austrian Empire ?

 By the way, did you know Austrian didn't only use German's settler, but also French's settlers
against the rise of Ottoman Empire :) ?
Mainly from romance Lorraine & Wallonia, when these areas were parts of Holy Roman Empire
and politically close to Austria.
 They create some towns like Seultour, Saint-Hubert, Charleville, Wallendorf/Wualdraf/Unirea,
and count Claude Florimond de Mercy was even one of the governor of Banat.

They were not as numerous as Germans settlers, but I've always find funny this historical fact ^^
Reply
:iconrodegas:
Rodegas Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
2 main reasons:
1. Mongols depopulated this are heavily, since they were burning fields and villages so even if people would hide in mountains, they died on starvation later, so a huge depopulation in this area.. the good side is that many castles we have are because of this event.
2. Since the time of Stephen, the first Hungarian king, the Germans were invited into the country primarily as experts able to contribute to uplift the economy.
German colonists were main force in creating cities here, that was important for development of crafts here, since our people were mostly farmers, peasants, working with wood. Of course it was not some charity, for example the mining cities they crete profited greatly on gold, iron, copper and so on that our land provided. 

Carpathian Germans

1880 population: 228 584
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
That would´ve been possible, there was a tribe called "Gepiden",
and they had a kingdom in the pannonian plains. I guess if the Huns never came,
the Germans would live more to the east, and the Roman Empire
would´ve recovered maybe. The Huns are the root of all that migration shit XD

Mh you may not forget, the Germans also lost some settlement areas, especially
when the plague came, but also the czechish hussits and others destroyed some stuff.
That´s why language islands like Brünn or Iglau came into being, they were connected
with the mainland before.

Yes I read about it, there were indeed eastern french settlers too, to help!
You should do a map about it.

Yeah it´s cool^^ Did they come together with the Germans and live with them
as western europeans?
Reply
:iconscipia:
Scipia Featured By Owner Dec 5, 2015
Oh yes I've heard about the Gepiden, they will be in my future Germanic Europe
map :)
However Magyar & Huns are differents civilizations ^^ I've heard that Huns were
turkish, and they were related with Khazar (by the way if the Khazar empire would've
survive, I guess Magyar would've never migrate in Central Europe, so "la boucle est
bouclée" as we said in French x) )

Ah, yes I always forget about plague and wars, there was the same thing at the franco-
german borders (french language lost some areas in Switzerland & Belgium and win others
areas in Lorraine).

A map about the French settlers in Banat & Transylvania ? Well they weren't numerous enough
I guess ^^' by comparison there is more Levantines (french speakings "childrens" of
franco-italians crusaders) in the former Ottoman Empire than French in Banat & Transylvania x)
But perhaps I will make a map of the former French crusaders states one day ^^

Yes they were close to the Transylvanians Saxons & Magyars, I guess the Walloons of Wallendorf
were probably already Germanized in the 19th century by eg, because they were considered
as Saxons
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 6, 2015
But most Hungaryans are slavic by ethnicity, they were just magyarized I read.
Only 20% of them are real asiatic people. Some say the Germans were born in
the battle against the Hungaryans 955 at the Lechfield near Augsburg XD
An enemy from outside can unite people.

Yes the borders shifted of course, but the french-german language border was
most of the time rather "clean", with hardly any language islands.

Yeah do that^^ I read some Germans settled in Romania and Bulgaria already
with the first crusades oO

Well I think if 100 german families and 5 french went together to Transylvania,
the french ones surely felt more related to the germans than to the sorrounding
Romanians and married also Germans and mixed up.
Reply
:iconscipia:
Scipia Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2015
Well I wouldn't say they were just slavics, because there was a lot
of different civilizations in pre-Hungarian Pannonia :)
But yes they aren't really asiatic, but even the first Magyars weren't
100% asiatics.

Oh really ? I guess they were invited by Byzantine empire ?

Yes, even if Romanians are romance speakers there was also a
religious difference. French only start to be assimilated to the
Romanians culture in the 19th century, with the regression of
religious identity.

It was also usual for French knight to participate to the northern
crusade with Germans (it was called "voyage de Prusse") even if
most of them didn't stay and come back to France :)
Reply
:iconarminius1871:
Arminius1871 Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2015
Are Romanians real Romanics, or just romanized slavs and dinarics?
Reply
:iconscipia:
Scipia Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2015
Well, the only real Romanics are :
- the romanized former Italic (brother language of latin in ancient Italia, see : en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_l… )
- their ancient colonies (Mediterranean part of Gallia, Cisalpina Gallia (northern Italia), many parts of Spain and Illyria, some areas of Rheinland & Danubians because there was a lot of Roman militaries colonies at the border)

But even in these areas they are very crossbread with Celts & Germanics (France, northern Italy & Spain), Tyrsenians (Etruscans & Rhaetians), Greek (Marseille, Nice, southern Italia), Illyrians (Albanese, Pannonian, etc...), Semitics (mainly in Spain & Sicilia), etc...

There is no "real Romanics" to be fair x) Romance civilization is about culture & language, not about race.
I don't consider myself as a "Romanic" by eg, I've more Frankish & Gallic ancestors.

So Romanians are crossbread of romanized Dacians, Romans settlers, some Greeks (there was many Greek colonies in their coasts), romanized Illyrian (Pannonians are parts of illyrian culture), probably some Slavics but they were minorities because Romance language succeed to stay here, even without a strong Romanic state.
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